EFF, Partners Launch New Edition of Santa Clara Principles, Adding Standards Aimed at Governments and Expanding Appeal Guidelines

14 hours 34 minutes ago
Revisions Based on Feedback About Inequitable Application, Algorithmic Tools

San Francisco—The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) and a coalition of civil society organizations and academics today released the second edition of the Santa Clara Principles on Transparency and Accountability In Content Moderation, adding standards directed at government and state actors to beef up due process and expanding guidelines for reporting on and notifying users about takedowns.

The Santa Clara Principles outline standards related to transparency, due process, cultural competence, and respect for human rights that internet platforms should meet in order to provide meaningful, public-facing transparency around their moderation of all user-generated content, paid or unpaid.

In May 2018, a small coalition of advocates and individuals released the original Santa Clara Principles in response to growing concerns about the lack of transparency and accountability by internet platforms around how they create and enforce content moderation policies. This first version of the Principles outlined minimum standards that internet platforms must meet to provide adequate transparency and accountability about their efforts to moderate user-generated content or accounts that violate their rules.

Since the release of the initial Principles, many internet platforms have endorsed and committed to adhering to the Principles, including Apple, Facebook, Google, and Twitter. However, the original Principles were created by a small number of organizations and individuals based primarily in the United States. Following the 2018 launch, many allies—particularly our colleagues from countries outside the United States and Western Europe—raised legitimate concerns and suggestions for their revision.

Stakeholders from around the world emphasized that platforms invest more resources in providing transparency and due process to users in certain communities and markets, creating fundamental inequities. Further, over the past several years, platforms have expanded their content moderation tactics to include interventions implemented by algorithmic tools, such as downranking. These companies have not provided sufficient transparency around how these tools are developed and used, and what impact they have on user speech and access to information.

Because of these concerns, the Santa Clara Principles coalition initiated an open call for comments from a broad range of global stakeholders, with the goal of eventually expanding the Principles. Using the feedback received through this open call, as well as through a series of open consultations and workshops, the coalition drafted the second iteration of the Santa Clara Principles.

“Allies from more than 10 countries made 40 sets of recommendations that were used to revise the Santa Clara Principles,” said EFF Director for International Freedom of Expression Jillian York. “We urge technology companies to adopt these revised guidelines and make a greater commitment to users across the globe to be transparent, fair, and consistent in moderating their online speech.”

For more about the Santa Clara Principles:
https://santaclaraprinciples.org/

Contact:  KarenGulloAnalyst, Senior Media Relations Specialistkaren@eff.org
Karen Gullo

Restore the 4th Minnesota: Racking Up Victories in 2021

15 hours 26 minutes ago

With the Snowden revelations in 2013 on NSA spying, many who were outraged sought to channel their frustrations first into mobilizing protests against state surveillance, and then into organizing local groups in defense of Fourth Amendment rights against unreasonable search and seizure. From this initial mobilization, Restore the Fourth was born as a network of decentralized, local groups. Restore the Fourth Minnesota (RT4MN) is very active, helping organize a local coalition known as Safety Not Surveillance, and joining with a wide range of other local groups, from those seeking community accountability reforms to police abolitionists. A member of the Electronic Frontier Alliance, the organization has recently helped ban government facial recognition in Minneapolis, defeated extra state funding to their local fusion center, and pushed for an expanded form of CCOPS (Community Control Over Police Surveillance) that they call POSTME (Public Oversight of Surveillance Technology and Military Equipment). 

The EFF Organizing Team caught up with Chris at RT4MN to hear about how they got organized and won victories this year for their communities.

What is Restore the Fourth Minnesota?

Chris: RT4MN is a grassroots nonprofit dedicated to restoring the Fourth Amendment of the U.S. Constitution. We advocate for personal privacy and against mass government surveillance.

We try to focus on state and local issues, but we also advocate on the national level with other Restore The Fourth chapters and advocacy organizations. The national Restore The Fourth movement initially grew out of the wave of national protests after the Edward Snowden revelations in 2013. The people who attended the subsequent protests started meeting regularly. After a couple of years, the chapter went dormant, but we rebooted in 2019. I have always been immersed in the intersection of technology and policy, but it was the Snowden revelations and the activism that grew up around it that opened my eyes to the importance of this topic, too.

How did it come back together in 2019? Was restarting the chapter easier than starting it initially?

Chris: I was not part of that initial wave of activity back in 2013. But my co-chair Kurtis and the rest of the original activists definitely laid the groundwork for our success.

Both Kurtis and I had a lot of friends who worked in technology, and who could see that issues of privacy were getting worse, not better. We both invited some folks we thought might be interested, and then emailed everyone who was on the chapter's old mailing list, finally doing a couple of Reddit meetup posts. At that first meeting, we discussed a path forward, some thoughts on how to grow the chapter, what our legislative objectives should be, and so on. The main thing we decided was that we should meet semi-regularly and reach out to the local ACLU to see if they were interested in working with us.

What have been some of the issues you've concentrated on and what were some of your early successes?

Chris: Our most significant accomplishment before 2021 was partnering with the ACLU and other local organizations in 2020 to establish an anti-surveillance coalition. That laid the groundwork for our success in passing a facial recognition ban in Minneapolis earlier this year. Our other big accomplishment was advocating against a budget proposal that would have added millions of additional funds to a local fusion center.

That being said, our primary focus has been CCOPS. The pace with which technology develops necessitates a holistic framework. Spinning up new policy proposals to push through the legislature, trying to ban technology x while strictly regulating technology y and promoting technology z is not going to work. The tech moves too fast and the legislative and judicial bodies move too slow.

Are there members of your group or coalition who are abolitionists? How does CCOPS/POSTME work within both a reform and an abolitionist framework in Minneapolis?

Chris: Yes, there are definitely a couple of abolitionist types in our group, and a couple of more moderate "surveillance technology can be useful if used properly" types. CCOPS is great precisely because it is a framework and not a one-size-fits-all solution. It leaves it up to people’s duly elected representatives to decide whether and under what circumstances surveillance technology is used, while ensuring that the community that will be impacted by the technology will have the information they need to either fight against or support it.

Tell us about how the community won Minneapolis' facial recognition ban.

Chris: After some initial discussion, the coalition approached Minneapolis City Council Member Steve Fletcher, who had already publicly done some work on surveillance issues. After some back and forth with him and other council members, the city passed a series of "privacy principles" which were nonbinding, but laid the groundwork for further action.

Soon afterwords, George Floyd was murdered. The public outcry placed a lot of pressure on the council. So we decided to pivot from a comprehensive surveillance reform to a more narrow but achievable aim, placing a moratorium on the use of facial recognition technology (FRT). CCOPS is great because it is comprehensive, but the downside is that it therefore required the input of a lot of different stakeholders.

Did the murder of George Floyd and ensuing uprising change the course of RT4MN's campaigns, or how you thought about and worked on these issues?

Chris: Yes, in too many ways to count. It certainly brought in a new wave of activists. The government’s response to the protests also highlighted some of the worst aspects of surveillance. As one example, the Minnesota fusion center performs ongoing social media surveillance, and right after the murder they sent several "reports" to the Minneapolis Police Department highlighting some out-of-context and hyperbolic tweets. Despite the protesters being mostly peaceful, the report exaggerated threats and descriptions of suspicious behaviors, stoking police fears and setting the stage for a massively overmilitarized response.

How did the work around the Minneapolis fusion center come about and how did the movement help defeat added funding this year?

Chris: We heard vague rumblings about it in the local activist grapevine, but in mid March things became much more solid when the proposed budget came out and there was a corresponding media push. The goal was to add millions of dollars to the budget and transform it into a 24/7/52 operation.

The Minnesota Senate was controlled by Republicans, who are already primed to cut spending from the proposed budget, so our task was to make sure that $5 million got to the top of the cutting block. So we hosted a live panel, sent around a petition, submitted testimony, and had conversations with lawmakers.

It’s hard to know for sure what tipped the scales, but the fusion center funding was removed from the House Public Safety and Senate Judiciary omnibus budget bills, and never made it into the budget.

What has your group learned about training people in Surveillance Self-Defense and in your other popular education work?

Chris: These trainings are fun and important (especially when you are helping fellow activists), but for me they mostly serve to reinforce the idea that leaving it up to individuals to protect their privacy is a losing strategy. I say this as someone who spends a frankly unhealthy amount of time and effort trying to protect my personal privacy.

Yes, it is important that people have the knowledge and ability to fight back when the government abuses our rights, but that distracts from the fundamental problem that the government is abusing our rights, and it needs to stop doing that.

What's on the horizon for RT4MN? Are there campaigns that your group has wished to prioritize in the past and you're now putting back on the agenda?

Chris: Drones. Drones are always on the horizon.

In all seriousness, it’s hard to pin down. There is a never-ending list of ways that the government wants to spy on us. Corporations love spying on us too, and of course all the data they collect eventually makes its way into the hands of the government.

In the immediate future we are looking at trying to get CCOPS passed in Minneapolis and getting facial recognition banned in Saint Paul, while also seeing if we can get some movement on better regulating drones, getting some Consumer Privacy protections, and hopefully banning Keyword Search Warrants.

José Martín

【おすすめ本】加藤登紀子『哲さんの声が聞こえる 中村哲医師が見たアフガンの光』─「優しくて強靭な意志」への鎮魂歌=鈴木 耕(編集者)

16 hours 12 minutes ago
これはラブレターなのです。去って行ったステキな人へのちょっと淋しい手紙なのです。 著者が「哲さん」と呼ぶ中村哲さんへの愛を込めて、二人の交友を淡々と綴ったのが本書です。 小さな断片の重なりが不世出の医師の生涯を写し出します。アフガニスタンに注いだ哲さんの思いは、あの「用水建設」や「診療所」に象徴され ます。それなのに、哲さんの無念の死。 第一部は哲さんの生き方の「軌跡」です。そして哲さんが起こした「奇跡」、ふたつのキセキ。 私が好きなのは第二部の「哲さんへの..
JCJ

第12世代CoreでLinuxのSpectre・Meltdown対策パッチを無効化する意味はない

1 day ago
LinuxではSpectreやMeltdown問題の対策として脆弱性対策を無効化するオプションパラメーターが存在している。2018年以前のインテル製CPUでは、SpectreやMeltdown対策は行われていないが、一部のLinuxユーザーはこの「mitigations=off」オプションをつけて起動することで、パフォーマンスを向上させていたという。この行為はセキュリティ上のリスクを伴うものだが、前世代のIntel CPUであれば測定可能な明確な性能差が出ることも分かっていたという(Phoronix)。 しかし、11月に発売された第12世代Core プロセッサ(Alder Lake-S)でもこのオプションを利用する意味があるのだろうか。Phoronixに掲載された記事では、その疑問に答えるためにオプションの有効・無効化によるパフォーマンスの差を調査している。Intel Core i9 12900K(Alder Lake-S)を搭載したシステムにUbuntu 21.10(Linuxカーネル5.15)をインストールした環境でテストが行われている。 それぞれのテスト内容やテスト項目に関しては元記事を見ていただきたいが、結論としてはIntel Core i9 12900K環境では「mitigations = off」の有無による差は、全体的にごくわずかなものだった。記事ではAlder Lake環境であれば、「mitigations = off」オプションを変更する価値はないと結論づけている。

すべて読む | Linuxセクション | Linux | セキュリティ | OS | Intel | スラッシュバック |

関連ストーリー:
Windows 11のCPU要件設定はSpectreやMeltdown対策をOS側でしたくないから? 2021年07月08日
Firefoxのテスト版にサイト分離機能を導入。MeltdownとSpectre問題に根本的な対策 2021年05月25日
一般PCユーザーに対してBIOS更新を勧める記事に不安の声が上がる 2020年07月07日
Intel、古い製品向けのドライバーやBIOSアップデートなどのダウンロード提供終了を進める 2019年11月22日
InteのIvy Bridge以降のCPUに新たな脆弱性が見つかる 2019年08月13日
Windows月例更新でVIAプロセッサ向けSpectre/Meltdown対策が盛り込まれる 2019年04月19日
CPUのSMT機能に関連した脆弱性が見つかる、SSL秘密鍵を盗む実証コードも公開 2018年11月07日
本来アクセスできないメモリ領域のデータを読み出せる可能性がある脆弱性が見つかる、多くのCPUに影響 2018年01月04日

nagazou

Firefox 95 リリース、新しいサンドボックス技術 RLBox が全プラットフォームで有効に

1 day ago
headless 曰く、Mozilla は 7 日、Firefox 95.0 をリリースした (リリースノート、 Mozilla Hacks の記事、 The Verge の記事、 Phoronix の記事)。 本バージョンでは「RLBox」と呼ばれる新しいサンドボックス技術が全プラットフォームで有効化されている。すべてのメジャーブラウザーは Web コンテンツをサンドボックス内で実行し、ブラウザーに脆弱性があってもコンピューターには影響を与えないようにしている。しかし、サンドボックス内のプロセスに影響を与える脆弱性とサンドボックスを迂回可能な脆弱性を組み合わせた攻撃もしばしば発生しており、さらなる保護の仕組みが必要となる。 次のステップとしては機能の境界でプロセスを分離することだが、パフォーマンスへの影響が大きい。そのため、RLBox ではコードを個別のプロセスに分離するのではなく、まず WebAssembly にコンパイルし、そこからさらにネイティブコードにコンパイルする。これにより、対象のコードはプログラムの予期しない部分へジャンプすることや、指定された領域外のメモリーにアクセスすることができなくなる。その結果、信頼されるコードと信頼されないコードの間で安全にアドレス空間を共有可能になるとのこと。 RLBox のプロトタイプは既に Firefox 74 で Linux ユーザーに、Firefox 75 で Mac ユーザーに提供されていた。Firefox 95 ではデスクトップおよびモバイルのサポートされるすべてのプラットフォームで有効化され、Graphite / Hunspell / Ogg の3つのモジュールを分離するとのことだ。

すべて読む | ITセクション | セキュリティ | Firefox | デベロッパー |

関連ストーリー:
Firefox ユーザーが誤って GitHub にアップロードしたとみられる cookie データベース数千件が見つかる 2021年11月22日
Mozilla Firefox、Windows 10 / 11 の Microsoft Store で入手可能に 2021年11月11日
Firefox 94、ウィンドウを閉じて複数のタブが閉じられる際の確認ダイアログがデフォルト非表示に 2021年10月30日
Mozilla Firefox、Microsoft Store に登場 2021年10月23日
Firefox 93のFirefox Suggestは実質広告ではないかとする指摘 2021年10月14日
令和3年分確定申告、医療費通知情報の自動取得などオンライン利用がより便利に 2021年10月12日
Mozilla、一部のFirefoxユーザーを対象に既定の検索エンジンを Bing に変更する実験 2021年09月20日

nagazou

Firefox 95 リリース、新しいサンドボックス技術 RLBox が全プラットフォームで有効に

1 day ago
headless 曰く、Mozilla は 7 日、Firefox 95.0 をリリースした (リリースノート、 Mozilla Hacks の記事、 The Verge の記事、 Phoronix の記事)。 本バージョンでは「RLBox」と呼ばれる新しいサンドボックス技術が全プラットフォームで有効化されている。すべてのメジャーブラウザーは Web コンテンツをサンドボックス内で実行し、ブラウザーに脆弱性があってもコンピューターには影響を与えないようにしている。しかし、サンドボックス内のプロセスに影響を与える脆弱性とサンドボックスを迂回可能な脆弱性を組み合わせた攻撃もしばしば発生しており、さらなる保護の仕組みが必要となる。 次のステップとしては機能の境界でプロセスを分離することだが、パフォーマンスへの影響が大きい。そのため、RLBox ではコードを個別のプロセスに分離するのではなく、まず WebAssembly にコンパイルし、そこからさらにネイティブコードにコンパイルする。これにより、対象のコードはプログラムの予期しない部分へジャンプすることや、指定された領域外のメモリーにアクセスすることができなくなる。その結果、信頼されるコードと信頼されないコードの間で安全にアドレス空間を共有可能になるとのこと。 RLBox のプロトタイプは既に Firefox 74 で Linux ユーザーに、Firefox 75 で Mac ユーザーに提供されていた。Firefox 95 ではデスクトップおよびモバイルのサポートされるすべてのプラットフォームで有効化され、Graphite / Hunspell / Ogg の3つのモジュールを分離するとのことだ。

すべて読む | ITセクション | セキュリティ | Firefox | デベロッパー |

関連ストーリー:
Firefox ユーザーが誤って GitHub にアップロードしたとみられる cookie データベース数千件が見つかる 2021年11月22日
Mozilla Firefox、Windows 10 / 11 の Microsoft Store で入手可能に 2021年11月11日
Firefox 94、ウィンドウを閉じて複数のタブが閉じられる際の確認ダイアログがデフォルト非表示に 2021年10月30日
Mozilla Firefox、Microsoft Store に登場 2021年10月23日
Firefox 93のFirefox Suggestは実質広告ではないかとする指摘 2021年10月14日
令和3年分確定申告、医療費通知情報の自動取得などオンライン利用がより便利に 2021年10月12日
Mozilla、一部のFirefoxユーザーを対象に既定の検索エンジンを Bing に変更する実験 2021年09月20日

nagazou

YouTube、第14回(【高江】第12回)を配信しました

1 day 1 hour ago
YouTube配信企画 ありがとうやんばるチャンネル第14回(【高江】愛知裁判勝訴報告と高江の近況ー第12回ー)がアップされました。 (5分49秒) 撮影:「ヘリパッドいらない」住民の会、映像編集:マーティ https://youtu.be/JTEN9ZpXp44 説明 愛知裁判勝訴の報告と高江の10月〜12月の近況について 【沖縄高江への愛知県警機動隊派遣違法訴訟の会】 https://aichi-okinawa-sosho.jimdofree.com 引き続き、これまで繋がってきた島々の現状を載せていきたいと考えています。 「ヘリパッドいらない」住民の会
高江イイトコ

害虫の飛行パターンをモデル化し3次元位置を予測。2025年までに高出力レーザー等で駆除へ

1 day 2 hours ago
農研機構は11月29日、空中を飛ぶ害虫の飛翔パターンをモデル化し、カメラの画像を基に先読みする技術を開発したと発表した。代表的な農業害虫であるハスモンヨトウを戻るに開発された(農研機構、Engadget)。 この技術ではリアルタイム画像から数ステップ先(0.03秒先)の位置を1.4cm程度の精度で予測可能だとしている。予測した位置にいる害虫に高出力レーザー光を照射することで、害虫を駆除する技術に応用できるとしている。これまでの化学農薬を使用する駆除方法と異なり、害虫が薬剤耐性を獲得してしまうリスクを減らすことができ、害虫防除と環境保全を両立させることができるとしている。

すべて読む | ITセクション | テクノロジー | バイオテック | バグ | サイエンス | IT |

関連ストーリー:
沖縄でゴキブリやムカデを捕獲すると5年以下の懲役または500万円の罰金になる可能性 2021年07月01日
天敵による捕食行動が昆虫の繁殖力を増加させる 2021年06月10日
福岡市内販売の春菊で基準値168倍の農薬が検出。21gで健康被害が出る量 2020年12月12日
和風アクションRPG内の古代稲作の再現度が高すぎて話題。リアル農家は精米機に感謝するレベルらしい 2020年11月18日
2020年ノーベル化学賞はゲノム編集ツールを開発した2氏が受賞 2020年10月08日
グレープフルーツの香りを特徴付ける成分、米国で虫除け剤や殺虫剤の有効成分として登録される 2020年08月14日
日本ではバッタではなくカメムシが全国に大量発生。今年は果物が高くなるかも 2020年07月18日
釣り餌として知られるブドウムシはポリエチレンを食べて分解できる 2017年04月28日

nagazou

Amazon Web Servicesで大規模障害。米国系サービスを中心に影響か

1 day 5 hours ago
Amazon Web Services(AWS)で7日に障害が発生し、その影響で米国に拠点を置くサービスを中心に影響が出ているようだ。障害が発生しているのは米国東部にあるUS-EAST-1リージョン。原因は、US-EAST-1リージョンにある複数のネットワーク機器の障害だとしている。この問題はAmazonの監視およびインシデント対応ツールの一部にも影響を与えた。午前10時の段階では大半の障害は復旧しつつあるようだ。日本時間の9時35分に行われたAWS Service Health Dashboardの更新情報によれば、ネットワーク機器の問題が解決したため、障害の出ているサービスの回復に向けて取り組んでいるとしている(AWS Service Health Dashboard)。 CNETの報道によると、この障害の影響により「Disney+」「Robinhood」「Barclays」「Slack」などのサービスにも影響があったとしている。またBloombergによれば、配送ドライバーと連絡に使うAmazonのアプリがダウンしたことから、ドライバーが配送ルートの割り当てや荷物を受け取れないなどの問題が起き、米国内で商品配送に影響が及んでいるとされる。また一部ゲームサービスなどでも影響が出ているとの告知が出ている(CNET、Bloomberg、Dead by Daylight公式)。

すべて読む | ITセクション | クラウド | ニュース |

関連ストーリー:
AWSで2日、6時間ほど障害が発生。さまざまなサービスに影響 2021年09月03日

nagazou